CDC Radiation Emergencies | Potassium Iodide (KI)

Radiation Emergency…

There is a lot of concern and worry about exposure to radiation from the explosions at the nuclear power plant in Japan.

Apparently, Hawaiians are purchasing potassium iodide and the supply is now scarce there at this time.

Here is a link to the CDC Radiation Emergency  site. FactSheet.http://www.bt.cdc.gov/radiation/ki.asp

“Potassium Iodide (KI)

What is Potassium Iodide (KI)?

Potassium iodide (also called KI) is a salt of stable (not radioactive) iodine. Stable iodine is an important chemical needed by the body to make thyroid hormones. Most of the stable iodine in our bodies comes from the food we eat. KI is stable iodine in a medicine form. This fact sheet from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gives you some basic information about KI. It explains what you should think about before you or a family member takes KI.

What does KI do?

Following a radiological or nuclear event, radioactive iodine may be released into the air and then be breathed into the lungs. Radioactive iodine may also contaminate the local food supply and get into the body through food or through drink. When radioactive materials get into the body through breathing, eating, or drinking, we say that “internal contamination” has occurred. In the case of internal contamination with radioactive iodine, the thyroid gland quickly absorbs this chemical. Radioactive iodine absorbed by the thyroid can then injure the gland. Because non-radioactive KI acts to block radioactive iodine from being taken into the thyroid gland, it can help protect this gland from injury.

via CDC Radiation Emergencies | Potassium Iodide (KI).”

Share your emergency preparations if you have any>

About lorettelavine

Wife, mother, grandmother, registered nurse, licensed clinical social worker, blogger. Parent and child advocate, involved in life.
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